I need some help with my DSLR camera!

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Hi! I am having some trouble with my camera. I use a CANON 1100D, and just the standard lens it comes with. I cannot figure out for the life of me how to change the settings to get more of a blurry background/sharper video picture! I don't know what buttons to press to change the ios etc. My video's are definitely not as sharp as I would like. It looks like they were filmed with a hand held camera, which is not the case!

I know that in manual mode you can do this, and I have, but it changes back as soon as I go into video mode.

I am also using EOS utility 2 to film so I can see myself on my laptop, but all of the buttons to change the settings in the application are greyed out.

Does anybody know what I am talking about, and how to change this? Thank you!
 

Ampix0

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Ok first I want to start out by saying that your camera is NOT for beginners. This is not a "good" camera because it is expensive. You have a LOT of research into photography ahead of you. I suggest starting with the "Vimeo Video School" which is a series by Vimeo that will teach you about how to use a DSLR and specifically how to use it for video.
 

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@mycatismyfriend You have the right camera for what you want. Cheap camera's have small sensors, DSLR's have bigger sensors. Big sensors are important when trying to get a blurry bg while the focal point (you) is sharp and in focus. You have to adjust your camera's aperture to get the effect you want. The effect is called: 'Shallow Depth of Field.' It requires a wide aperture starting at: f/2.8, and then: f/5.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, and so on. Also, the focal length of your lens plays a part. When I was in college, I took a photography class and my professor said that the best thing to do when trying to understand your camera's settings is to read the manual. There should be a section explaining how to adjust your aperture.
 

Ampix0

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@mycatismyfriend You have the right camera for what you want. Cheap camera's have small sensors, DSLR's have bigger sensors. Big sensors are important when trying to get a blurry bg while the focal point (you) is sharp and in focus. You have to adjust your camera's aperture to get the effect you want. The effect is called: 'Shallow Depth of Field.' It requires a wide aperture starting at: f/2.8, and then: f/5.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, and so on. Also, the focal length of your lens plays a part. When I was in college, I took a photography class and my professor said that the best thing to do when trying to understand your camera's settings is to read the manual. There should be a section explaining how to adjust your aperture.

Just so you know, the larger apertures are actually the lower numbers. f/8.0 is a pin hole. I have a 50mm f/1.8 that is well suited for this effect at short distances. I know you may already know this, but I wanted to clarify for anyone reading your comment.
 

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Ok first I want to start out by saying that your camera is NOT for beginners. This is not a "good" camera because it is expensive. You have a LOT of research into photography ahead of you. I suggest starting with the "Vimeo Video School" which is a series by Vimeo that will teach you about how to use a DSLR and specifically how to use it for video.
It's an entry level DSLR camera.
 

Ampix0

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It's an entry level DSLR camera.
This principals are all the same as any DSLR. As apposed to a $300 point-and-shoot with all the extra features. The manual control is an entirely different concept. There is a trend of people buying expensive DSLRs with the false pretense that they are just better point-and-shoot cameras and do not understand the concepts behind creating the shots they want. But that's why I mentioned a great tutorial series to learn.
 

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Just so you know, the larger apertures are actually the lower numbers. f/8.0 is a pin hole. I have a 50mm f/1.8 that is well suited for this effect at short distances. I know you may already know this, but I wanted to clarify for anyone reading your comment.
Yes, I said the wider (larger) apertures create a shallow depth of field. It starts at f/2.8. Smaller apertures starts at f/16. Also depends on the lens you're using and focal length.[DOUBLEPOST=1458882033,1458881920][/DOUBLEPOST]
This principals are all the same as any DSLR. As apposed to a $300 point-and-shoot with all the extra features. The manual control is an entirely different concept. There is a trend of people buying expensive DSLRs with the false pretense that they are just better point-and-shoot cameras and do not understand the concepts behind creating the shots they want. But that's why I mentioned a great tutorial series to learn.
She can't get that effect with cheap point and shoots. The sensors are too small and can't handle it. No one said anything about buying expensive DSLRs. She doesn't have an expensive DSLR.
 

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Yes, I said the wider (larger) apertures create a shallow depth of field. It starts at f/2.8. Smaller apertures starts at f/16. Also depends on the lens you're using and focal length.
Right, I see you changed it to "Wider" which is more clear.[DOUBLEPOST=1458882081,1458882040][/DOUBLEPOST]
Yes, I said the wider (larger) apertures create a shallow depth of field. It starts at f/2.8. Smaller apertures starts at f/16. Also depends on the lens you're using and focal length.[DOUBLEPOST=1458882033,1458881920][/DOUBLEPOST]

She can't get that effect with cheap point and shoots. The sensors are too small and can't handle it. No one said anything about buying expensive DSLRs. She doesn't have an expensive DSLR.
I mean a DSLR is expensive in comparison to a standard hand-held video camera.
 

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Right, I see you changed it to "Wider" which is more clear.
Um... I never changed anything. In my original post I have "wide aperture." I know what I'm talking about.

"@ mycatismyfriend You have the right camera for what you want. Cheap camera's have small sensors, DSLR's have bigger sensors. Big sensors are important when trying to get a blurry bg while the focal point (you) is sharp and in focus. You have to adjust your camera's aperture to get the effect you want. The effect is called: 'Shallow Depth of Field.' It requires a wide aperture starting at: f/2.8, and then: f/5.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, and so on. Also, the focal length of your lens plays a part. When I was in college, I took a photography class and my professor said that the best thing to do when trying to understand your camera's settings is to read the manual. There should be a section explaining how to adjust your aperture."