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How to be aware of copyrighted item in our vid?

UKHypnotist

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Ultimately, I think YouTube is trying to get rid of the vast majority of monetized channels. The worst thing they ever did was allow mass monetization in the first place. YouTube was always about people uploading cat videos and the like. Now it's all about money. It's killed the platform. I've seen people suggest that YouTube might be trying to get down to between 100,000 and 500,000 monetized channels and everyone else won't be.

And I'd be fine with that.
Yes; as a non-monetized YouTuber, I'd expect you would be at that.

I agree with you on the mistake of opening the Partner Programme to all comers, by the way. I myself go back to the time it was invitation only, and I got invites for nearly every channel I ran at the time.

I don't think they are trying to get down to between 100,000 and 500,000 partnered channels, though. I think the ultimate intention is to close the Partner Programme altogether.

Then YouTube will be free to persue elimination of user-generated content in its entirety. It's my personal belief that YouTube has somehow gotten the wrong-headed notion that it can be the next Netflix or HULU; but as all the best spots in that platform genre are already firmly taken, Google is about to sink the YouTube "ship" if it dares to try entering this market.
 

Cephus

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Yes; as a non-monetized YouTuber, I'd expect you would be at that.

I agree with you on the mistake of opening the Partner Programme to all comers, by the way. I myself go back to the time it was invitation only, and I got invites for nearly every channel I ran at the time.

I don't think they are trying to get down to between 100,000 and 500,000 partnered channels, though. I think the ultimate intention is to close the Partner Programme altogether.

Then YouTube will be free to persue elimination of user-generated content in its entirety. It's my personal belief that YouTube has somehow gotten the wrong-headed notion that it can be the next Netflix or HULU; but as all the best spots in that platform genre are already firmly taken, Google is about to sink the YouTube "ship" if it dares to try entering this market.
See, I don't care. I've had monetize-able channels before and I didn't monetize them. I have a real job. I do YouTube for the personal enjoyment and if that enjoyment stops, I'll stop. The problem is, YouTube is a business too, they have to make money and this whole monetization mess is more of a headache to them, I'm sure, than a benefit. You may very well be right that the whole YPP is going away and I'd be fine with that because, as I said, I don't rely on YouTube for my income. The other option they might try is that for any channel that wants to be monetized, those people need to pay for the server space and bandwidth they use, like a real business. I will never understand where people get off, thinking YouTube owes them something for the free service they offer. YouTube is picking up the tab and doing all of the heavy lifting and people think they are entitled to make money off of YouTube's labor. If most of these channels had to pay the true cost of doing business online, they'd flip their lids. Giant channels might survive. Little ones? Not a chance.

Clearly what's been going on isn't working. It's why changes are being made. YouTube only has a responsibility for looking out for themselves and their own financial interests. If people want to have online video-businesses, fine. Let them pay their fair share and carry their own weight. Pay YouTube for the server space they use and the broadcast and bandwidth costs. How many channels would still be out there getting monetized? Not many. And I'm fine with that.
 

UKHypnotist

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I am a 63 year old, retired person. If you think I rely on YouTube for my main income, you are looking in the wrong direction.

As I have to spend cash to make my content, all the monetization programme is for me, is a bit of return on investment, while I put out content with the intent of assisting others to live better lives. In fact, my original channel which I no longer post to, predates your own by 9 years; I joined when YouTube was only a year old and still in negotiations to be sold to Google. The YPP existed at this point; but only for large corporate partners who had to pay six figures US just to get in.
The other option they might try is that for any channel that wants to be monetized, those people need to pay for the server space and bandwidth they use, like a real business.
This option would most likely cause the people being charged, to flood YouTube with even more questionable-quality content. Why? Because just as I feel I need now, they will want to make back what they are paying and profit on top of that. When one pays out thousands per year to create content, expectation of some ROI is only natural; and it isn't a matter of "thinking YouTube owes them something".

We see what the future will bring; I am already looking beyond YouTube.
 
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