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Good but cheap vlogging camera for indoors?

Discussion in 'Video Editing, Recording, Software & Hardware' started by coratison, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. coratison
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    Hi guys, I am currently looking for a good but cheap vlogging camera for indoors. Or just a regular camera that records good video / audio doesn't have to be advertised as a vlogging camera.
    But if you want good video and audio is there anything available at a price between maybe 50- 100 ? Or would you definitely have to be willing to pay more money than that ?
    Thanks for the help :)
     
  2. FleXiNaToR
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    If your budget is only 50 to 100 then check out the video called 'Best Vlogging Camera Under $100'
    But I would invest in a more expensive camera to be honest,
    also make sure the Camera has Continuous focus during video recording
     
  3. satiricals
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    You don't need continuous focus if the camera you use has a wide enough depth of field. If you get a camera that has a small, shallow range of depth of field then you'll need continuous focus & preferably auto focus as well. Camcorders tend to have a wider depth of field than a DSLR/Picture camera that does video.

    Also internal microphones tend to suck (especially on DSLR/mirrorless/picture camera rigs) because the mic is compressed by other camera components in motion. It's always better to get a cam/camcorder with an external mic input, even if it's just a 3.5mm input. A camcorder is your best bet of having a device with a decent internal microphone. Even then it's best you learn to record for room tone, learn to isolate it (real easy in audacity) and remove it from your audio track.
     
  4. coratison
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    If you wanted to buy one, how much would you invest at most / least ?
    Also thank you for the tip with the continuous focus!
     
  5. Masters of Kung Food
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    If you can stretch your budget (although at your given price this is definitely stretching it), the Canon SL2 at $550 is great value for its price. I just bought one the other day off Amazon.
     
  6. satiricals
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    You only really need continuous focus if your camera is going to be a shallow depth of field.

    Some lenses can get so shallow that the point of your nose is completely in focus but it is blurred out by the time it gets to your eyes.

    If you get a camera that looks like it's mainly there to take pics & just happens to do video as a secondary feature then your camera is going to have a shallow depth of field.

    [​IMG]
    (shallow depth of field)
    I believe a lot of vloggers use the canon g7x because it has continuous focus.

    The good thing is picture cameras (especially DSLR and Mirrorless rigs) is that they to be mostly a giant sensor. So they can use less light without having to add iso pixels (or much iso pixels) to get a well lit shot.

    [​IMG]
    (wide depth of field)
    A camcorder is going to have a wider depth of field simply because the body itself has more depth to work with than a picture camera.
    If you get a camcorder at a comparable price to a picture camera; then the camcorder is going to have a lot less bang for your buck when it comes to sensors. That means it needs more light to work with otherwise you will get a lot of iso pixels trying to shoot in low light.

    Camcorder Tip: keep iso on auto for on the go vlogs to account for differing intensities of light as you go through different areas.

    Pic Cam Tip: Use auto iso as a last resort to account for differing intensities of light as you go through differing areas. The bigger sensor and wider aperture means you got a wider range of what light intensity will work. (especially on mirrorless, DSLR & especially ESPECIALLY full frame sensor DSLRs. Most DSLRs are typically APS-C sensors)
     
  7. FleXiNaToR
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    I personally wouldn't use the camcorder because you Can't take pictures and I also need shallow depth of field,plus With a dslr you can change the lenses
    but Camcorders, on the other hand, tend to be simpler to use, more comfortable to shoot handheld and offer long recording times
    Dslr Camera is the way to go in my opinion tho
     
  8. satiricals
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    A frame of video is technically a picture. There is a reason they use to call cinema "motion pictures".
    A DSLR actually gets a way higher resolution with stills over video because video is a secondary feature. They're primarily designed as picture cameras. That's why the internal microphone is always horrible & in productions it's at best used as "reference audio" for a second system audio set up.

    But the budget for a camera is horrible for a DSLR. He'd really have to know cameras (I went to film school hence why I know my s**t) to get the best bang for his buck.

    That's why I'm suggesting a camcorder because they're primarily designed for video and the audio that is expected to come with video these days. You'll get the best internal microphone with a camercorder as far as the bang for your buck goes. If you don't care about iso pixels then an auto iso camcorder will have you covered in a good amount of lighting situations.

    A dslr for $50- $100, your internal microphone audio is going to be garbage (and you're not going to find a dslr with continuous focus for that price. You might be able to find a regular digital picture camera with continuous focus for that price) and you will need to record room tone, isolate the noise profile, then remove it from your whole audio track (so you're going to have to pull your video into the editor, render the whole recording for audio output, load that into audacity, grab your room tone area [which you should grab roomtone for each change of scenery], get the noise profile, select the area of the track for that scene, remove noise tone, & repeat. You will have to do this to salvage your audio because as is it would be reference audio quality to any sort of production).

    If you upload as is with internal mic audio on a dslr or digital picture camera, the audio is going to be so unappealing that no one will watch your vlogs. And vlogs are already a pretty captured up market since the production value needed for them is almost non existent.
    --- Double Post Merged, Sep 12, 2017, Original Post Date: Sep 12, 2017 ---
    Any good production relies on sound design. If you only got $50 to $100 then don't prioritize all of that money going towards the visuals with your rig. Get a camcorder that will have decent audio and will need less salvaging in post. If spend all of your money trying to get the best visuals; it's going to be a pain in the a** dealing with audio in post.

    I did a portrait doc on a native council member once. I had second system audio but it had an actual gain dial & a gain dial that just affected previewed audio. I was pretty much 1 man crewing this interview so I messed up. One of the xlr cables was defunct and adding static. I thought I dialed it out and kept it plugged in to kind of assure him everything was going ok. Big mistake, I couldn't use any of the lav audio because the audio file my second system actually mixed together had the static drowning his lav mic.

    I was using a really nice camera. I don't even think you could call it a camcorder at that point but it was definitely motion picture oriented.

    I pulled up an old gear reservation doc when I was in an event videography class. It was the hmc 150 I had has my main camera on that doc. I also had a canon rebel t5 getting a 2ndary angle for the interview on the subject.

    So anyway when I knew my second system audio messed up (which was actually suppose to be the main coverage of audio), I knew I had to salvage this project with the audio my cameras caught.

    The canon rebel t5 is like a $350 new DSLR to put this in perspective. The audio was so bad that I couldn't even do the audacity trick of isolating the noise profile & removing it from the whole track. The salvaged audio from that source came out all glitchy'esque sounding. It just wouldn't work.

    It was the HMC150's (which I actually did first; I just wanted to see if the DSLR audio would be good for mixing up the sound bites. Since we'd actually cut out a lot of unnecessary dialogue) audio that saved my a**. I was using the internal camera mic on the HMC 150 but the depth of the body definitely allowed the device to keep it's gears away from the mic better. The HMC150 is about $1,800 dollars new (I was loaned one from the school's cage for the weekend. The most expensive camera I shot on is a canon c100 which is currently around $2,500 just for the body but we got them when they were around $5000 for our kits).
     
    #8 satiricals, Sep 12, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
    Reide likes this.
  9. Reide
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    I do photography as a course and the first lesson I learned (to simplify it) was that even cheap cameras can be decent. Basically its all about lighting. All my recent videos are taken by the same camera. But the quality looks different due to to lighting. The difference is cheaper cameras have less room to move with aperture, ISO and shutter speed.

    I use my phone. This is the stats.
    Megapixels
    8
    Aperture
    f/2.0
    UX
    Gesture Shot,
    Gesture View,
    Front Facing Soft Light

    I could use the other camera on it
    Megapixels
    16
    Aperture
    f/1.8
    Sensor size
    1/2.6”
    White balance
    Yes (variable)
    Image stabilization
    Yes
    Autofocus type
    Laser
    Flash
    Single LED
    RAW capture
    Yes
    HDR
    Available


    but the fact is I find lighting to be the most important thing. And I find the screen helpful for framing. If you're wanting a decent cheap cam the olympas stylus point and shoot cost me $199 about 3-4 years ago. You could even look at second hand options although they aren't always going to be in the best condition.
     

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